“A Siren Wailing for No Reason” … and other poetic responses to the last Wednesday Writing Prompt

Thankyou Jamie for featuring three of my poems.

THE POET BY DAY

The last Wednesday Writing Prompt July 12, 2017– The cold war: there was so much revealed by the singularity of that time. What crazy quirks do you remember or have you heard about from those you know who lived through it?

Here are responses from poets: Renee Espriu, Sonja Benskin Mesher, Paul Brookes and poet and writer, Dan Roberson.  Bravo! 🙂


A Siren Wailing for No Reason

The sun had risen high in the blue sky
over rolling hills of farm country
causing a dry heat much as the roiling
heat of the home of her childhood
produced in waves upon asphalt streets

she knew the howl of a siren near by in
the close distance as she sat visiting
with her son her terrier mix at her feet
and he saw her puzzled look asking why
to glean the meaning of that sound now

for she recalled a time years…

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SUNDAY ANNOUNCEMENTS: Calls for Submissions, Contests, Events and Other News and Information

Thankyou Jamie for publishing my small piece on my new chapbook.

THE POET BY DAY

CALLS FOR SUBMISSIONS

Opportunity Knocks

THE APPLE VALLEY REVIEW, A Journal of Contemporary Literature publishes a bi-annual zine (spring and fall) that accepts submissions of poetry, short fiction and essays on a year-round basis. Details HERE.

BLACK DANDY, a quarterly literary digest will debut later this year, publishing work “steeped in the long tradition of strange fiction. Based in New Zealand, with an international reach, Black Dandy welcomes readers and writers to worlds that seem right around the corner.” Submission guidelines HERE.

THE BeZINE submissions for the August 2017 issue – themed Theatre –  closes at midnight PST on August 10th. Publication date is August 15th. Poetry, essays, fiction and creative nonfiction, art and photography, music and theatre (videos), and whatever lends itself to online presentation is welcome for consideration. Please check out a few issues first and the Intro./Mission Statement and Submission Guidelines. No…

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The July 2017 Issue of “The BeZine” – Prison Culture/Restorative Justice

THE POET BY DAY

July 15, 2017

This month’s publication focuses on Restorative Justice. This is a topic that is dear to me. I am the Director of the Youth Chaplaincy Coalition. I have been working with incarcerated folks and those touched by incarceration since 2003. I have seen the ripples of harm that have come. There is harm to the victim, of course. But there is also harm to the person who committed the harmful act, harm to their families, and harm to the communities that encircle all of these people.

Restorative Justice is an en vogue term. Everyone wants it but we don’t know much about how to do it. Most of us look backwards at the ancient ways of first peoples such as the Māori people of New Zealand or the Tagish and Tlingit First Nation people of the Yukon. We lift their practices and bring it forward into a…

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“A World Where” blurbs on the back of my new book. Thankyou to Kate, Ron and Matt.

After reading the poems in A World Where, anything seems within the bounds of possibility. At times dark, but with plenty of humour, the absurdity of our own world is renewed again and again through the kaleidoscope view of Paul Brookes’ imagined realities. A fascinating collection.

Kate Garrett, editor of Picaroon Press and Three Drops From A Cauldron

Paul Brookes is a rare & wondrous poet. Fully vested, mature, his poems work the line & surprise the reader & the English language with quantum muscularity & delightful, metaphoric insight. —

Ron Androla, author of “Confluence” (Busted Dharma Press) & many other books.

A world where, by poet Paul Brookes is a great trip through the life of a real original. These poems take you on a smart and interesting journey. Paul is a writer of unique talent and an original world view. He does not write like anyone else, which is rare in itself, that these poems are so good only makes you all the more glad you have them in your hand. This is a book worth reading over and over. Paul is a real talent and a powerful poet as I am sure you will agree.
Matt Borczon, author of “The Clock Of Human Bones”

Honoured to get a five star review on Amazon for my recent poetry collection “A World Where.” Thankyou Average Joe

Average Joe says

 

I enjoyed this collection immensely — the familiar turned on its head, the play of the language, the bone deep subjects Brookes chooses to tackle. Brookes uses language in a wonderful way, at once intimate to the point of blood and challenging. No easy trick. He has a wonderful and unique voice here which he maintains throughout, even as the collection gathers its rhythms. “Birth is a Time for Grief” is a particular favorite, as is “We Wait for Sick Sunblaze To.”