Goose Summer

When a late November goose
down day, warm and dry,
becomes over years
a filmy substance
a ballooned thread,
fly fish cast into the void,
 
a winter veil
nets your face
in the garden
or down the lane,
dew bling breath
in stubbled fields,
 
a warm spell of spiders
among the ice.
 
A strange movement
of language from
goose summer
to gossamer,
as if it has lost weight,
 
under plumage,
thinned with the years
into one word,
to soft filaments,
blown on a breeze,
 
the decomposed dead,
spider thread.
 
ALTERNATIVE VERSION
 
When a plump late November goose
down day, warm and dry,
becomes over years
a filmy substance
a ballooned thread,
fly fish cast into the void,
 
a winter veil
nets your face
in the garden
or down the lane,
dew bling breath
in stubbled fields,
 
a warm spell of spiders
among the ice.
 
A strange movement
of language from
goose summer
to gossamer,
as if it has lost weight,
a cloud into contrail,
 
under plumage,
thinned with the years,
beggared
into one word,
to soft filaments,
blown on a breeze,
 
the decomposed dead,
spider thread.

NB

GOSSAMER
c. 1300, “filmy substance (actually spider threads) found in fields of stubble in late fall,” apparently from gos “goose” (see goose (n.)) + sumer “summer” (see summer (n.)). Not found in Old English. The reference might be to a fancied resemblance of the silk to goose down, or more likely it is shifted from an original sense of “late fall; Indian summer” because geese are in season then. Compare Swedish equivalent sommartrad “summer thread,” Dutch zommerdraden (plural). The German equivalent mädchensommer (literally “girls’ summer”) also has a sense of “Indian summer,” and there was a Scottish go-summer “period of summer-like weather in late autumn” (1640s, folk-etymologized as if from go). Thus the English word originally might have referred to a warm spell in autumn before being transferred to a phenomenon especially noticeable then. Compare obsolete Scottish go-summer “period of summer-like weather in late autumn.” Meaning “anything light or flimsy” is from c. 1400; as a type of gauze used for veils, 1837. The adjective sense “filmy, light as gossamer” is attested from 1802.
From online etymology site.

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