#NationalMarineWeek 2021 24th July – 8th August. Thirteenth Day August 5th: Coastal And Marine Vegetation, Have you written unpublished/published poetry/artwork about, or that includes coastal and/or marine vegetation ? Poetry and Artworks/photo challenge. When a week is sixteen days to account for the tides in Britain. Here are the second eight day themes: Aug 1st: Crabs and other crustacea, Aug 2nd: Rocky Shorelines, Aug 3rd: Mermaids And Sea Monsters, Aug 4th: Sea Shanties, And Other Sea Songs, Aug 5th: Ocean Vegetation Aug 6th: Deep Sea Aug 7th: Shorelines Aug 8th: What Should We Do For Sealife?

Thirteenth Day – Coastal And Marine Vegetation

Lost Dolls of the winter Beach Mary Frances

Lost Dolls Of The Winter Beach by mary frances

 

small charcters of the low tide mary frances

Small characters of the low tide by mary frances

Flat holm / Steep holm

Too Welsh for the English
Too English for the Welsh,
sometimes it seems I should make my home
in the middle of the Severn estuary
with oozings and miles of mud,
to be drowned twice a day in the brisk tide
as punishment or reminder that I am
Too English for the Welsh
Too Welsh for the English.

But I am all oyster-catcher
and sand eel, stunted grass and drift,
flat-topped and steep-sided on my
island-home sanctuaries come prisons,
places reserved for those who are
Too Welsh for the English
Too English for the Welsh,
where all kinds of gull call and cry,
but cannot teach me the anthem’s words.

I am wild peony and golden samphire,
Buck’s plantain and wild leeks
snaked about by slow worms, blue
in their markings like the sea.
I am crane’s bill and trefoil, stone crop
and rock lavender, all the colours
of land and sky, yet still
Too English for the Welsh
Too Welsh for the English.

-Kate Noakes

Sea Rocket

5,000 miles in a 747
have taken you to Harris Beach, Oregon,
to find Sea Rocket by the boardwalk
where nobody will ever know your name
and the place you’ve come from:

Seaburn, where the same genus of plant
stowed perchance in cargo holds
to unfurl in spores at Hendon Docks
now protrudes from dunes by the North Sea
which you know doesn’t know your name.

Later, looking into the window front
of the Brookings branch of the Democrats
you’re mistaken for an eager voter
who shares a common belief
in free access to public health care.

Pineapple Weed grows in the slats
of paving here, too—the way it does
on the Ash path where your parents live.
Some things you know the names for,
others you’re yet to learn.

-Jake Morris-Campbell (This poem – first published by Fragmented Voices – is from a sequence written for Stringing Bedes: A Poetry and Print Pilgrimage, a Heritage Lottery Funded project which linked the twinned Wearmouth-Jarrow monasteries in 2015-16.)

Ray Mears Beavering A Wild Wind-swept scene

Dense spiky tufts, bind the dunes.
Swaying, lush, feathery, coastal prairie.
Knobbly, slimy, tide-abandoned.

Succulently seeding salt-flats in vibrant green,
is it baby asparagus; no
it’s a a thornless mini-cactus.

Blasted gorse.
Wind-bent Pine.
Wasted wine bottle
misses message.

Sea Campion –
Witches’ Thimble.
Meet me on the shore;
Wear a carnation.

Fancy a cabbage ?
Tried sea kale ?
A splurge of stems
root in shingle.

Salt-laden winds, shifting ground,
challenge a plant –
they respond with tolerance.

Needle-leaves, yellow flowers, rock-niched.
Is that coconut I smell ?
Of gorse.

Sea Thrift; Sea Pink ; Rock rose ;
in low clumps, marshed, shored,
on cliffs it grows.
It’s nectar-rich flowers
buzz with pollinators.

What hides behind those dunes ?

Vikings . . .
Off road buggies . . .
Nudists . . .
Trendy Cuisine . . .
Ray Mears beavering . . .

-John Wolf 5th August 2021.

The Marine Sonnets

Marine Plants (List Poem)

Eel Grass, Sea Grass or Grass Wrack, Dwarf Eel Grass
or Sea Grass, Marram Grass, Sand Sedge, Hound’s Tongue
Sea Couch, Sea Rocket , Common Scurvygrass,
Sea Kale, Yellow Horned Poppy, Adder’s Tongue.

Sea Holly, Sea Spurge, Sea Stock, Sea Spleenwort,
Autumn Lady’s Tresses, Rock Sea Spurrey,
Ray’s Knotgrass, Sea Milkwort, Long-spiked Glasswort,
Sea Beet, Sea Stork’s-bill, Lesser Sea Spurrey.

English Scurvygrass, Shore Dock, Autumn Squill,
Common Glasswort, Sea Arrow-grass, Rock Samphire,
Cord-grass, Sand or Warren Crocus, Spring Squill,
Sea Pink, Sea Daffodil, Golden Samphire.

Saltwort, Buck’s-horn Plantain, Sea Plantain,
Sea Campion, Sea Aster, Sea Purslane,

Eel Grass to Sea Arrow Grass (As Found List Poem)

Eel Grass, Sea Grass or Grass Wrack, Dwarf Eel Grass
or Sea Grass, Marram Grass, Sand Sedge,
Frosted Orache, Sea Rocket, Sea Bindweed,
Sea Kale, Hound’s Tounge, Sea Holly, Sea Spurge,
Yellow Horned Poppy, Sea Stock, Adder’s Tongue,
Sea Daffodil, Ray’s Knotgrass, Sand
or Warren Crocus, Saltwort, Sea Spleenwort,
Sea Pink or Thrift, Hottentot Fig,
Rock Samphire, Sea Stork’s-bill,
Golden Samphire, Rock Sea Lavender,
Buck’s-horn Plantain,Sea Plantain,
Shore Dock, Autumn Squill,
Spring Squill, Sea Campion,
Rock Sea Spurrey, Autumn Lady’s Tresses,
Sea Aster, Sea Purslane, Sea Beet,
English Scurvygrass, Common Scurvygrass
Sea Couch, Sea Milkwort, Long-spiked Glasswort,
Common Glasswort, Purple Glasswort,
Perennial Glasswort, Common Cord-grass,
Townsend’s Cord-grass Lesser Sea Spurrey,
Annual Seablite, Sea Arrow-grass.

-Paul Brookes

Bios And Links

-Kate Noakes

is a PhD student at the University of Reading researching contemporary British and American poetry. He most recent collection is The Filthy Quiet, Parthian, 2019. She lives in London.

-mary frances

Mary works with found art, collage, and cut-up text, always curious about alternative ways of looking and the rearrangement of things. She walks a lot, with a pocket camera, drawn to small, hidden, or neglected places where she takes pictures of things which may or may not be there.

-Jake Morris-Campbell

is a writer, critic and tutor based in Tyne & Wear. His debut collection of poetry, Corrigenda for Costafine Town, is forthcoming with Blue Diode Press. This poem – first published by Fragmented Voices – is from a sequence written for Stringing Bedes: A Poetry and Print Pilgrimage, a Heritage Lottery Funded project which linked the twinned Wearmouth-Jarrow monasteries in 2015-16.

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